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I have found 380 results for the term "Science" in the entire database.


151. Middlesex High School - Material Science-Honors Overview
     MATERIAL Science HONORS is a course intended to introduce students to the laboratory and classroom experiences that they would encounter in the exciting field of material Science and engineering (MSE). 
     Material Science and engineering is one of the most highly interdisciplinary and dynamic engineering disciplines. Material scientists and material engineers seek to understand the fundamental relationships between the structure, properties, processing and performance of materials so that we can synthesize new materials, develop improved processes for making materials and understand the role of materials in the changing environment of tomorrow.

152. MIT - Department of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences (EAPS)
     From the inaccessible depths of the terrestrial interior to the vast reaches of our galaxy, our planet and the natural systems surrounding it provide important clues to the course of our future. At MIT’s Department of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences (EAPS), we examine the history and interactions of these systems in order to predict future events and states with greater accuracy.
     Our work encompasses elements of geology, geochemistry, geophysics, geobiology, atmospheric Science, oceanography, astronomy, and planetary Science. With a department this broad and deep, we are able to apply fundamental scientific principles across traditional borders, leading to rich interdisciplinary collaborations and programs of study. Undergraduate and graduate students alike will reach a more profound understanding of the origin, evolution, current conditions, and future state of the solid Earth, its fluid envelopes, and the complex solar system that encircles us.

153. MIT - Department of Materials Science and Engineering
     MIT's Department of Materials Science and Engineering is known as the world-wide leader of its field, based on its academic program, its highly regarded faculty, and the high caliber of its students. Its continuing record of pioneering advances in engineering Sciences and technologies stems from its ability to relate new developments and advances to engineering practice and its close relationship with industry. These advances are then incorporated in current teaching and research programs.
     Faculty and student research ranges from the purely scientific to applied studies and involves perspectives of chemistry, physics, electronics, the artistic and historical aspects of materials, design, and entrepreneurial ventures. Interests within the Department span the entire materials cycle from mining and refining of raw materials, to production and utilization of finished materials, and finally to disposal and recycling. There is a rich variety of problems of vital importance to the development of the Science of metals, polymers, ceramics, glasses, electronic materials, biomedical materials, composites, and other materials awaiting solution. The Department has the theoretical and experimental resources available to attack these scientific and engineering problems successfully.

154. MIT - Environmental Science and Engineering
      Parsons Laboratory for Environmental Science and Engineering
     The Parsons Laboratory for Environmental Science and Engineering in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering has a long history of highly respected water and environmental research. From its inception as a hydrodynamics laboratory in the 1950s, the lab has evolved into a multidisciplinary research center focused primarily on natural waters and the environment.
     The well-being, prosperity and sustainability of the human enterprise relies on the functioning of Earth's natural systems and their complex physical, chemical and biological processes. Water is a central theme in terrestrial, oceanic, atmospheric, agricultural and industrial systems alike.

155. MIT - Foreign Languages and Literatures
     The study of foreign languages and literatures provides valuable experience and a potential edge for future career development. Scientists and engineers function in a global market: they rely on primary sources published in other languages, attend international consortia, and often find themselves interacting across national, cultural, and linguistic borders. Government and industry often give preference to job applicants who are proficient in a foreign language. MIT students are encouraged to work and study abroad in conjunction with university, private and public organizations.
     The faculty of FL&L, the language coordinators, and the Undergraduate Academic Administrator can provide assistance in choosing an appropriate program and granting transfer credit from overseas or domestic programs. Over IAP (MIT's Independent Activities Period during winter break), FL&L offers intensive introductory language subjects in addition to intensive subjects designed to help students plan for living and working in France and Germany. In addition, students have the option to cross-register at Wellesley College or Harvard University throughout the academic year. Relevant subjects taken at qualified institutions here and abroad may fulfill MIT's Science, engineering and humanities requirements.

156. MIT - Massachusetts Institute of Technology
     The mission of MIT is to advance knowledge and educate students in Science, technology and other areas of scholarship that will best serve the nation and the world in the 21st century — whether the focus is cancer, energy, economics or literature (learn more about MIT's current initiatives).

157. MIT - Massachusetts Institute of Technology - Engineering
     Massachusetts Institute of Technology's School of Engineering believes in the future.
     Everything is changing, and the people making these changes are engineers: we make things, and we make things better. Our collective challenges are steep, and they are global. Improved systems and tools for generating energy, protecting our fragile environment, and protecting us from disease have the potential to improve the lived experience of people from all corners of the planet. Narrow approaches make for small solutions. MIT's strategy for addressing global challenges is to approach them on their own terms. By welcoming the widest range of knowledge, experience, and expertise under a single intellectual roof, our faculty, researchers, and students attack problems-and solve them-on the grandest scale.
     Founded in 1861, MIT and its School of Engineering have a proud history of influencing the world through technological leadership and research innovation. MIT is one of the world's preeminent research universities: renowned for rigorous academic programs in Science, technology, and other areas of scholarship; cutting-edge research; a diverse campus community; and a longstanding commitment to working with the public and private sectors to bring new knowledge to bear on the world's complex challenges.
     The School of Engineering educates about 60 percent of MIT's undergraduates and 45 percent of our graduate students. Just over a third of MIT's faculty are in the School.

158. MIT Department of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences (EAPS)
     From the inaccessible depths of the terrestrial interior to the vast reaches of our galaxy, our planet and the natural systems surrounding it provide important clues to the course of our future. At MIT’s Department of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences (EAPS), we examine the history and interactions of these systems in order to predict future events and states with greater accuracy.
     Our work encompasses elements of geology, geochemistry, geophysics, geobiology, atmospheric Science, oceanography, astronomy, and planetary Science. With a department this broad and deep, we are able to apply fundamental scientific principles across traditional borders, leading to rich interdisciplinary collaborations and programs of study. Undergraduate and graduate students alike will reach a more profound understanding of the origin, evolution, current conditions, and future state of the solid Earth, its fluid envelopes, and the complex solar system that encircles us.

159. MIT Department of Linguistics
     The MIT Linguistics Group has been engaged in the study of language since the 1950's, and the first class of PhD students was admitted in 1961. Our research aims to discover the rules and representations underlying the structure of particular languages and what they reveal about the general principles that determine the form and development of language in the individual and the species. The program covers the traditional subfields of linguistics (phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, and psycholinguistics) as well as interfaces with philosophy and logic, speech Science and technology, computer Science and artificial intelligence, and study of the brain and cognition.

160. MIT Department of Mechanical Engineering
MechE - Our thrust is improving life on earth
     Mechanical engineering at MIT is nearly as old as MIT itself, and its impact on the Institute and on society itself is easily demonstrated by noting the alignment of the department's evolution with key events and technological advances in the world.
     MechE's origins trace back to the end of the American Civil War, in 1865. Its earliest areas of focus included extensive programs in power engineering and steam engines for both transportation and fixed use. By the mid-1870s, with the Industrial Revolution well underway in North America, the department became known officially as Course II. It innovated the use of lab subjects, giving students the opportunity to apply methodology to current engineering problems with hands-on lab work.
     The specializations offered at the time reflected the industries of greatest growth, including marine engineering, locomotive engineering, textile engineering, and naval architecture. In 1893, marine engineering spun off from MechE as its own course and remained independent until it merged back (as Ocean Science and Engineering) in 2005. By the turn of the century through the advent of World War I, programs in steam turbine engineering, engine design, refrigeration, and aeronautical engineering set the stage for the technological advances to come.

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